Programme

The European Conference on Language Learning 2017 (ECLL2017) is an interdisciplinary conference held alongside The European Conference on Education 2017 (ECE2017). Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. Registration for either conference will allow participants to attend sessions in both.

This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


  • Enhancing the Development of Law Students’ Critical Reasoning Skills Through the Use of Complex Decision-Forcing Case Studies
    Enhancing the Development of Law Students’ Critical Reasoning Skills Through the Use of Complex Decision-Forcing Case Studies
    Spotlight Presentation: Professor Charles Wild
  • Education for Change: Addressing the Challenges of UN Sustainable Development Goal 4
    Education for Change: Addressing the Challenges of UN Sustainable Development Goal 4
    Featured Panel Presentation: Professor Brian Hudson & Professor Kwame Akyeampong
  • Educating for Change: Educating for Global Citizenship
    Educating for Change: Educating for Global Citizenship
    Featured Panel
  • Impact of Mechanical Error Correction Strategy for a Class of Composition in L2 French
    Impact of Mechanical Error Correction Strategy for a Class of Composition in L2 French
    Spotlight Presentation: Dr Bernard Montoneri
Enhancing the Development of Law Students’ Critical Reasoning Skills Through the Use of Complex Decision-Forcing Case Studies
Spotlight Presentation: Professor Charles Wild

Traditionally, an integral part of the educational strategies of business schools, law schools and medical schools has centred on the use of case studies. Whilst each discipline has, over time, adopted their own approach to case studies, ranging from the case method utilised by business schools through to the casebook method used by law schools, the aim remains to encourage students to engage in intensive discussion and detailed analysis of the scenario. The format relies on students having read the underlying discipline-specific theory and being prepared to apply that knowledge to the specific themes and climate forces at work within the case study. In other words, the aim is to shift the educational focus from teaching students WHAT to think, to teaching them HOW to think; to develop and enhance their wicked skills, including that of critical reasoning. Based on their experience within both business and law schools, coupled with their extensive use of the case study method, the authors propose: 1) The use of case studies addresses key HE concerns relating to student employability and the development of key wicked skills; 2) Whilst traditionally, disciplines such as business and law have developed differing formats to the use of case studies, the adoption of a multi-disciplinary approach to case studies is essential. The authors will use the example of their successful Legal Risk Management, Governance & Compliance course, where law students have addressed both classic and complex decision-forcing case studies, requiring them to engage in real-world, multi-disciplinary scenarios.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Education for Change: Addressing the Challenges of UN Sustainable Development Goal 4
Featured Panel Presentation: Professor Brian Hudson & Professor Kwame Akyeampong

Panel Chair: Professor Brian Hudson, University of Sussex, UK
Panellists: Professor Kwame Akyeampong, University of Sussex, UK

The United Nations Declaration in September 2015 on ‘Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’ sets challenges for all countries through agreement reached on the Sustainable Development Goals. In particular SDG 4 focuses on ‘Quality Education’ and aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. In this panel we will discuss how we have been addressing this challenge at the University of Sussex over recent years and in particular will focus on the partnership that has been developed between Sussex and the College of Education at the University of Ghana in that time. The role of educational research to inform policy and practice is central to our way of working.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Educating for Change: Educating for Global Citizenship
Featured Panel

Featured Panel Chair: Dr Joseph Haldane

UNESCO considers global citizenship education to consist of “Nurturing respect for all, building a sense of belonging to a common humanity and helping learners become responsible and active global citizens.” This panel will look at the ways in which language teachers in particular are positioned to educate for global citizenship, and indeed carry a particular responsibility, burden or opportunity to engage with this concept.

The panellists will discuss how language can shape identities and transform students, drawing on their personal experience of the transformative effects of language on their students as well as on themselves.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Impact of Mechanical Error Correction Strategy for a Class of Composition in L2 French
Spotlight Presentation: Dr Bernard Montoneri

This study aims to explore the quantitative and qualitative learning performance of a class of composition in L2 French (junior students) in Taiwan by applying statistical methods such as SPSS and Excel. The students of a French department following a course of writing during the academic year 2015–2016 are chosen as the research object. The data collected includes students’ scores, class attendance, students’ composition assignments (almost one per week during two consecutive semesters), and several questionnaires. The results of numerical analysis are used to clarify whether our designed teaching methods can improve students’ writing skills. Through discussing the effect of teamwork, the indicators selected to evaluate students’ writing level, and the impact of writing topics, we attempt to figure out a flexible teaching/learning method suitable for different levels of students. The key evaluating indicators contributing to students’ good or poor writing ability are also discussed. Using mechanical error correction methods can notably help teachers identify students’ most common and recurrent mistakes. It also appears that students who are not native speakers prefer their instructor not only to systematically highlight their errors, but also to correct their French. The proposed learning improvement mechanism presented in this study may also be applied to other fields or other languages in future studies.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.